Episode 56: 4G Broadband Wireless (Sept. 9, 2009)

During our news segment Glen Nakafuji from Oceanit talked about their newly awarded National Transportation Safety project. The project has a broad scope and requires the company to hire project managers and technical staff. If you are looking for a job at a very progressive technology company, you should check out Oceanit’s job postings.

Bytemarks Cafe - Sept. 9, 2009Ray Kakuda from Clearwire was on to give us an update on 4G Broadband Wireless service. Clearwire is rolling out WiMax in their key markets across the country. On Nov. 1st Honolulu will start to get commercial WiMax. Access speeds are reported to be comparable to cable modem and DSL rates, multi-meg downloads and 1 meg upload. We will report back actual speeds once we get our hands on the actual service.

And now the News:

  1. Hawaii tax credit program cost state $1.29 billion through 2008
  2. Expedition to extinct Papua New Guinea volcano unearths new species Here is a video of the giant rat talked about in the article. There was a YouTube video but that is evidently no longer available. This video is a photo sampling of the variety of new species found on the expedition.
  3. Further study on irradiator ordered To follow the trail of produce like papaya from local farmer to out of state markets is very interesting and probably not fully appreciated. In order to sell produce to out of state markets, Hawaii needs to 1) eradicate all the fruit flies or 2) thoroughly clean the produce. Mike Kohn from Pa`ina Hawaii is proposing an irradiation solution. Check out his website for his perspective on irradiation. Also Kayla Rosenfeld of HPR produced this news piece on the project.
  4. UH Mānoa oceanographers examine mercury levels of pelagic fish in Hawaii

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Bytemarks Cafe – Episode 42 – June 3, 2009

First we’ll look at the latest tech news and happenings in Hawaii and beyond. Then we’ll have Leah Lamb from Current here to talk about the So Much More Hawaii bloggers tour. Later, Sunni Brown from Brightspot Info Design and Chris Gargiulo from KCC join us to discuss “visual thinking” and information design. Technorati 3pmc4fix2a

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Bytemarks Cafe on 2-week hiatus

Bytemarks Cafe is on a 2-week hiatus and will be back live on January 7, 2009. Ryan and I got 12/24 and 12/31 off for obvious reasons. I am glad to have the break especially during this busy time of the year. We are wishing that all of you have a great holiday season and all the best for 2009! If you have any suggestions for show topics in 2009 feel free to contact us at feedback [at] bytemarkscafe (dot) org.

Bytemarks Cafe – Episode 20 – Dec. 17, 2008

After the headlines, Russel Cheng from Oceanit will join us to tell us about a very cool iPhone app. Then, we’ll talk to Dan Zelikman and Sid Savara about privacy and transparency in the brave new world of social media.

In the News this week:

  • Puna Geothermal Ventures is celebrating it’s 15th anniversary, and Bytemarks Cafe got at chance to talk with Mike Kaleikini, the company’s general manager, about reaching the milestone. Kaleikini said, “it was a tough start in the beginning, but we’re still here after 15 years and needed now more than ever.”
  • In the search for extraterrestrial life, some astronomers are on the hunt for “Super-Earths,” and specifically, planets in other solar systems that may have liquid oceans.
  • The Air Force’s Pacific Air Command is getting into blogging, and is going outside conventional military channels to do it. Acknowledging that their audience no longer turns to mainstream media, officials at Hickam Air Force Base recently rolled out the PACAF Pixels blog.
  • Construction began in earnest last week on a 65-foot research vessel that will help a Hawaii-based ship design company develop and test new technologies for port security, including “unmanned surface vessels” or USVs.
  • Event update: The Pacific Telecommunications Council will be holding its 31st Annual International Conference from January 18th to the 21st at the Hilton Hawaiian Village.

The song pick of the week is “I Love Nerdy Boys” by Emi Hart.

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Bytemarks Cafe – Episode 16 – Nov. 19, 2008

This week, as part of our tech news segment, HPR’s Kayla Rosenfeld tells us about the test run of NASA’s Lunar probe on Mauna Kea. Later, we’ll talk to Patrick Henry from Univ. of Hawaii’s Institute for Astronomy about Dark Matter.

News stories for the week…

  • Located approximately one mile off the coast of Kaneohe Bay in 100 feet of water, New Jersey company Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. installed one of its wave power generation units. The ocean buoys called PowerBuoy, harness the energy of ocean waves to generate electricity that is then sent back to shore via underwater cable.
  • As the prevalence of broadband internet access grows, its reliance on dial-up connections is dropping rapidly. According to the latest “State of the Internet” study from Akamai — the internet powerhouse with the Hawaiian name — dial-up, or “narrowband” connections, fell nearly 30 percent in the last quarter nationwide.
  • Last week Thursday, Hawaii County Council voted to uphold a ban on growing genetically modified taro and coffee on the island. The council voted 7-0 to override Mayor Harry Kim’s veto of the measure. Anyone caught violating it could face a $1,000 fine.
  • Observatories in Hawaii were able to use advanced optical technology to produce the first “visible light” photographs of a multi-planet solar system outside our own. Scientists were able to see, 130 light years away in the constellation Pegasus, three “gas giants” larger than Saturn and Jupiter orbiting the star called HR8799.

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Bytemarks Cafe – Episode 15 – Nov. 12, 2008

We are joined in the studio by Dr. Bee Leng Chua from HPU who tells us about the upcoming Global Entrepreneurship Week. Then, we speak with Patrick Sullivan from Hoana Medical and Oceanit about Dual Use applications and converting projects to products.

News stories for the week…

  • Mauna Loa on Hawaii Island has been quiet for a long time and it’s been 25 years since it last erupted—but researchers warn that another eruption may be on the horizon. Even so, trying to determine the exact date when the mountain will blow is impossible.
  • Scientists have gotten the first clear picture of the feeding habits of Hawaii spinner dolphins, and they used high-tech acoustics to get it. Unlike other dolphins, Hawaii spinner dolphins are nocturnal and feed and night. Only by using underwater hydrophones were researchers able to “see” just how remarkable their rituals were.
  • The BYU Hawaii Campus Safety and Security department is implementing a new emergency system. The new system, similar to systems deployed at other Universities across the country, utilizes technology such as text messaging and e-mail in the attempt to inform students of danger in a timely and effective manner.
  • Going from YouTube to Hollywood seems an unlikely path for any budding filmmaker, let alone two high school kids from Hilo who had nothing better to do after school than pick up a camera. Now Ryan Higa and Sean Fujiyoshi are bonafide internet celebrities — and budding “real” celebrities — with the recent premiere of their feature film, “Ryan and Sean’s Not So Excellent Adventure.”

Song pick of the Week: U2 – Beautiful Day

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Bytemarks Cafe – Episode 14 – Nov. 5, 2008

This week, after the headlines, we’re joined in the studio by Ted Abe, who tells us about the upcoming Sony Expo. Then, we talk with Dr. Christine Sorensen from the UH College of Education and Mark Hines of the Mid-Pacific Institute about the transformation of the traditional classroom. You can learn more about the transformation of education in Hawaii at the Future Schools site.

News stories for the week…

  • 11,000 feet above sea level, climate scientists from the University of Colorado and the University of New Mexico studying the water cycle have successfully deployed a precision water isotope analyzer at a remote monitoring station near the top of Mauna Loa.
  • The Navy successfully intercepted one of two ballistic missiles this past weekend in the latest test of the nation’s missile defense system. The target missles were launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands on Kauai, and two Navy ships — the Aegis destroyer U.S.S. Paul Hamilton and the U.S.S. Hopper — took aim and fired their own missiles to intercept it.
  • Honolulu Community College and the Pacific Center for Advanced Technology Training or PCATT, accept a $327 million technology grant in the form of new software that will help students in Hawaii receive the latest training and gain a competitive edge in business.
  • The National Institutes of Health has awarded $1.31 million to help 6th, 7th and 8th graders in Hawai‘i and the Pacific Region learn about scientific research and possible careers in science. The funding is for the Pacific Education and Research for Leadership in Science (PEARLS) project, headed by Dr. Kelley Withy of the John A. Burns School of Medicine at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

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Bytemarks Cafe – Episode 11 – Oct. 15, 2008

This week, Eugene Villaluz will join us in the studio to tell us about HMAUS Mactoberfest and later, we’ll talk to Shari Tamashiro, Cybrarian from Kapiolani Community College about Digital Storytelling, the Hawaii Nisei Story and Hawaii Memories.

It’s day 8 (don’t ask me why I say day 5 on the recording) of Celebration 2008 so if you enjoy Bytemarks Cafe and want to support tech reporting in Hawaii, please do consider making a donation online or by calling (808) 941-3689. Be sure to mention Bytemarks Cafe!

  • Mauna Kea will soon be the center of attention for NASA scientists when they test a robot designed for lunar prospecting. From  November 1st  through the 13th, the Big Island volcano will stand in for the moon so that the robot — called Scarab — can simulate a lunar mission to extract water, hydrogen, oxygen and other compounds that could potentially be mined for use by future lunar explorers.
  • Speaking of Mauna Kea, spectacular new photos of the planet Uranus taken from the Keck II Observatory were unveiled Monday at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society’s Division for Planetary Sciences. Since Uranus takes 84 years to orbit the sun, suffice it to say space observation has evolved considerably since the last time astronomers got a good look at the icy blue planet.
  • With fluctuating oil prices and a challenging economy, both public and private sector organizations are turning to alternative work environments such as telecommuting, flex time, work at home and four-day workweeks to ease the pain to their bottom lines and their employees’ wallets. That includes the Hawaii state government, which is piloting a four-day work week. Information Technology, or IT, is key to making it work.

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Bytemarks Cafe Episode 4 – August 27, 2008

On this episode we talk to Van Matsushige of Sopogy and Peter Rosegg of Hawaiian Electric Company. Both are involved with companies shaping Hawaii’s evolving energy landscape, one a solar energy provider and the other Hawaii’s primary electric utility.

In the News…

  • Google has said it invested $10.25 million to develop geothermal-energy technology aimed at extracting steam deep inside the earth to generate more electricity. The search giant’s investment arm, Google.org, has committed $6.25 million to AltaRock Energy, $4 million to Potter Drilling and $489,521 to the Southern Methodist University Geothermal Lab.
  • Students on Molokai have just received the first of 100 Apple laptops being distributed for “Project OHANA,”a program aimed at putting technology and connectivity into the hands and homes of students in rural communities in Maui county. Project OHANA — or Online Health and Academic Network Access — will ultimately distribute 100 laptops to students of Maui Community College, and it’s hoped that the computers will be used both by the students and their families.
  • With all the stories about sea faring vessels making their way across the Pacific propelled by low-carbon footprint methods like wind and rowing here is a land vessel going in the opposite direction. Laurel White has left her home in Paia, Maui in order to stage a North American environmental green energy tour in what she is calling her EcoVan.
  • Hollywood has built a fortune on the fear of meteors striking the Earth, wreaking “Armageddon” on the planet, but such disasters are not solely the realm of science fiction. There are scientists around the world dedicated to identifying “near Earth objects” or NEOs, and one of the most impressive efforts is being mounted here in Hawaii. It’s called the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System, or Pan-STARRS, and the first of four telescopes is already scanning the skies. But as it turns out, STORING the massive volume of data involved requires a serious database.
  • Muxtape, the love-child of the Internet and 80s cassette mix tapes, has had its plug pulled by the Recording Industry Association of America. If you go to muxtape.com you will be greeted with a brief statement that Muxtape will be “unavailable for a brief period while we sort out a problem with the RIAA.”
  • This week’s song pick come from Muxtape before getting shut down. Here’s We Were Promised Jetpacks and their song Moving Clocks Run Slow.

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